Choosing a Promotional Product for Brand Marketing

Choosing a Promotional Product for Brand MarketingA pen or a jump drive? A baseball cap or t-shirt? Or how about a calendar.When it comes to branded promotional products, there are a lot of options. Finding those that make the most sense comes down to three things: the business, the audience and the brand.

The Business

A branded golf ball as a promotional item makes sense for a sports-apparel company, but not so much for a book distributor.Promotional items should be industry related. They should be something that customers and leads will see and immediately associate with the company that gave it to them—branded book marks, for example, are perfect for book distributors.

The Audience

Nobody likes to receive something they can’t use or don’t really want. And no organization wants to invest in promotional items that will be tucked away in a desk drawer or thrown in the trash.

That’s why companies need to consider their audience when deciding which promotional item they’re going to use. Have an audience that sits at a desk all day? Consider a mouse pad. Have an audience that’s out and about, calling on customers? How about a travel mug?

Giving the people what they want and/or need goes a long way toward maximizing the impact of a promotional product.

The Brand

It’s important to remember that promotional items are every bit as much a part of building and supporting a brand as a logo, website, customer service and brochure copy.

Promotional products send a message about the businesses they’re promoting. If a company’s brand is higher end, its promotional item should reflect that. If a company’s brand is affordable (and excellent, of course), its promotional items should reflect that.

But either way, quality should never be sacrificed—people like things that work well, regardless of their monetary value. One caveat to this is older demographics; according to the Advertising Specialty Institute, people who are 55 or older tend to prefer, keep and use items that are more expensive. Younger people (aged 21-34) aren’t as impressed with cost. They prefer items that make their lives easier.

About Toby Crabtree

Toby Crabtree is the Account Manager for Local Search HQ, a local search engine marketing firm focused on enhancing the online presence and visibility for small local businesses. Through thorough research of the client's target market and online behavior, social media networking, local mobile search optimization and an integrated marketing campaign, Toby and the team at Local Search HQ has built a reputation for delivery results for its clients since it was founded. Google+

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